Tag Archives: search

Boodigo

X Googlers dive into porn with Boodigo, a new search engine

Boodigo

Porn. Porn. Porn. We just can’t seem to get enough of it. By 2015, mobile adult content and services are expected to reach $2.8 billion per year, mobile adult subscriptions will reach nearly $1 billion, and mobile adult video consumption on tablets will triple. Not to mention 1.6 billion searches for pornography since the start of 2014. What’s next you say? Why the need for a better porn search engine and that’s exactly what several former Google employees have set out to do with their new brand new experiment: BoodiGo.

Boodigo made its official debut back on September 15 and according to one of its founders, porn producer and director Colin Rowntree, it has “taken off like a rocket.” Boodigo was formed by Rowntree and tech company 0x7a69. So what is so great about BoodiGo, you ask? After all, you’ve got a ton of porn search engines on the Web today. Redtube, xvideos, xhamster, pornhub, it’s endless. Why does the Web need another porn search engine?

According to Rowntree, “Google and Bing have gradually been weeding out the industry’s adult content and that (for us) has been tremendously frustrating. If someone is looking for videos of oral sex and tries to find them via Google, what they get is an article by Wikipedia and advice from Cosmopolitan. And when they get what they’re looking for it can well be pirated material.”

Boodigo is organized with a double process of verification, which in the first place associates key words of the search with content, and secondly checks to see that the content belongs to trustworthy sites and not to pirate sites with fraudulent and malicious intentions, the Boodigo founder said. Additionally, Boodigo safeguards the user’s privacy by disabling the use of cookies or other tracking mechanisms that obtain information about Internet users.

The search engine was also designed to guard the user’s anonymity. Besides its commitment to turning up un-pirated, non-virus-infected search results, Boodigo also promises users it won’t harvest any of their personal data to sell to advertisers.

Boodigo is a partnership between porn company Wasteland (NSFW) and west coast tech firm 0x7a69. Five of the west coast programmers, Mr. Rowntree said, are “refugees from Google” who were “not liking the way things were going.”

Now go try Boodigo and let me know if you’re happy with the quality of the search results.

 

Unhappy with food service

French blogger gets fined for negative restaurant review in Google

Unhappy with food service

You’re familiar with Yelp and its seemingly endless reviews of restaurants by so-called “food critics.” While in general most complaints about a bad restaurant experience have more to do with service than with food, on occasion it’s the food that takes the lion’s share of the blame. But for French restaurant critic Caroline Doudet, she found out the hard way what happens when a restaurant you patronize fights back because of a negative review you posted in Google.

BBC News reported that the owner of II Giardino restaurant took Doudet to court because her negative review of his restaurant and its prominent position on Google was “unfairly hurting their business.” Ms. Doudet’s wrote a blog post (which has since been taken down) with the title “the place to avoid in Cap-Ferret: Il Giardino.”

The review appeared fourth in Google search rankings when searching for the restaurant. The judge ruled that the title of the post needed to be changed so its title wouldn’t rank as high in Google’s search engine. The judge also decided that the damage done by Doudet’s post was exacerbated by Doudet’s fashion and literature blog, “Cultur’elle” and indicated that the size of her fan-base (in this case about 3K followers) was enough to consider her opinion influential.

As part of the ruling, Doudet was ordered to amend her post title and pay damages in the amount of €1,500 ($2,000; £1,200) as well as an extra €1,000 to cover Il Giardino’s costs.

This action suggests a number of important questions.

What about free speech? And what was so terrible about Doudet’s review?

Most of us who eat out from time to time have experienced poor service or poor fare. But how many of us blog about it or better yet, has a significant number of fans that might be influenced by your review? In this case, the judge felt the blogger was influential and their negative review was going to have a deleterious impact upon the business of the restaurant.

What did the owners of Il Giardino have to say?

The restaurateur admitted that there were “some errors in the service, that happens sometimes in the middle of August.” But what mattered was the way someone can criticize and doing so with respect. In this case, the article continued to place high in Google search results and was causing harm to the restaurant’s reputation, especially given the restaurant’s 15 years in business.

When BBC asked Doudet about the case she said, “This decision creates a new crime of ‘being too highly ranked [on a search engine]’, or of having too great an influence. We look for bloggers who are influential, but only if they are nice about people.”

L’esprit de France – so much for the revolution!

Alors que pensez vous? Is this European censorship related to search engine results gone haywire? If you have influence, are you not allowed to freely express yourself without fear of retribution? What might have been a better course of action? Did the restaurant owner bother to contact Doudet first before taking her to court?